God Fixed It!

Our family recently had an experience that reminded us of the power of prayer. It was a Monday morning and I was trying to get off to work when we discovered that the water wasn’t working in our home. Now, to some of you, this probably sounds like a minor problem. But we felt pretty fragile at the time. We had just moved into a new home and had already dealt with a lot of repair issues and we felt like the last thing we needed was another problem to deal with. To make matters worse, you don’t realize how much you rely upon water until you go without it.

 

I won’t go into all the details but I will say it ended up being a long morning. First, I went to the township building, then they suggested going to an auto-body shop (the water guy works there), and finally I came back home. Along the way I made some phone calls and bought some water at the grocery store. Nobody seemed to be able to give us any answers as to why the water was not working. After Steph and I talked things over for a while and I tested out a few more things, I had an idea. I called our little family up to the kitchen and we held hands and we prayed. We had done pretty much everything we could think of, and now all we could do was to leave it in God’s hands. Probably around half an hour later, Steph came up from downstairs and asked, “Did you try anything more with the water?” I said, “No honey, nothing.” She proceeded to walk over to the sink and turn the faucet on. Of course, I was skeptical given the amount of times we had tried without success, but low and behold, it worked! We were shocked!

 

The best line, without a doubt, came from our 4-year-old son John. “God fixed it!” I love how little minds are so logical. He had heard the prayer, he had seen the result, and there was no doubt in his mind what had taken place – God had fixed our water problem! I said to Steph, why did you all of a sudden want to test the water again? She told me, “I just felt like God was saying, ‘trust me and try it.’”

 

To be honest with you, we have had a few of these faith-building experiences over the past year. God has come through for us time and time again. I feel kind of silly that I am so prone to doubt when God has taken care of us and provided in a million different ways, but I often do. What was so memorable about this one was that our kids got a first hand experience in the power of prayer. Only God could have ordained and ordered things in this manner, and it’s safe to say our kids won’t soon forget this experience.

 

The words of Jesus in Matthew 7:7-8: “Ask, and it will be given to you; seek, and you will find; knock, and it will be opened to you. For everyone who asks receives, and the one who seeks finds, and to the one who knocks it will be opened.” This is a simple verse but it is oh so powerful. If you are a child of the King, you have the privilege of asking your loving heavenly Father for literally anything. You may not get exactly what you asked for, but you can trust that God will answer your prayer according to His will. 1 John 5:14-15 puts it this way: “And this is the confidence that we have toward him, that if we ask anything according to his will he hears us. And if we know that he hears us in whatever we ask, we know that we have the requests that we have asked of him.”

 

Before I forget, let me tell you the rest of the story. Later on that afternoon, one of the water guys finally showed up. As it turns out, they had been doing some work in our area and had to turn off the water. They had told everyone else about it, but had neglected to tell us, perhaps because we were the new kids on the block. But Steph and I were not bitter at all about what had transpired that morning. God had given our family a powerful lesson that we won’t soon forget.

A Simple Way to Pray

Last year I stumbled across a little book by Martin Luther called A Simple Way to Pray. The story behind the book is that Luther’s barber, Master Peter Beskendorf, asked him the simple but important question – how do I pray? Of course, Master Peter’s question resembles that of the disciples in Luke 11. After hearing Jesus pray, one of His disciples asked, “Lord, teach us to pray” (Luke 11:1). It was clear to this disciple, probably along with all the rest, that their prayer life was weak and in need of help. Jesus responded by teaching them what came to be known as The Lord’s Prayer. We could make the case that the Lord’s prayer, along with Jesus’ prayer in John 17, are among the greatest in all of Scripture.

 

Well, Luther’s advice to Master Peter was to take the Lord’s Prayer (along with the 10 Commandments and the Apostles Creed) and expand on it. Take, for example, the first line, “Father, hallowed be your name.” Meditate on the thought, Luther would say, of God as your heavenly Father. Along with that, think of the greatness and sacredness of the name of God. Luther writes, “Yes, Lord God, dear Father, hallowed be thy name, both in us and throughout the whole world…..Convert those who are still to be converted that they with us and we with them may hallow and praise thy name, both with true and pure doctrine and with a good and holy life. Restrain those who are unwilling to be converted so that they be forced to cease from misusing, defiling, and dishonoring thy holy name and from misleading the poor people. Amen.”

 

As you can see, Luther takes one small portion of the prayer and greatly expands on it, with the central theme remaining the sacredness of God’s holy name. He then moves on to the next part of the prayer, still following the same method. Just as an as an aside, Luther was legendary for his prayer life. Often rising at four in the morning, Luther would spend an hour or two in prayer in order to kick-start his day. If you are struggling in your prayer life (and I think we would all say our prayer life needs some improving), then you would be wise to follow Luther’s advice. What is great about this method is it can be applied to tons of different passages of Scripture. We can go beyond the Lord’s Prayer or the 10 Commandments to many other parts of Scripture. The Psalms are a great place to go, but I would also recommend the New Testament epistles. Paul, in particular, has several prayers in his New Testament letters. Of late, I have been meditating on Colossians where Paul includes a moving and powerful prayer at the beginning of the letter.

 

“And so, from the day we heard, we have not ceased to pray for you, asking that you may be filled with the knowledge of his will in all spiritual wisdom and understanding, so as to walk in a manner worthy of the Lord, fully pleasing to him” (Colossians 1:9-10). The prayer continues for a few more verses – be sure to look it up.

 

In using Luther’s method we could proceed in the following manner. “Lord, help me to pray without ceasing. Give me a heart for prayer. Give me great joy in communing with you throughout the day. And Father, help me to pray often for my fellow Christians in the same way that Paul did.” We would then continue with the next part of the prayer. “Lord Jesus, fill me with the knowledge of your will. Thank you that you have revealed yourself to me that I might know how to walk and live. May I always live in obedience to your will, being led by your Spirit at all times. And Lord, fill me with all spiritual wisdom and understanding. I want to be wise beyond my years. I want to live a life that is worthy of you, but I know I can’t do it on my own – Lord help me! Oh, that I would live in such a manner that is pleasing to you.”

 

Obviously when you use this method of prayer you can personalize it. You can pray in your own way, but what is great is that you have a template to work from. One of the benefits of using Scripture is that it allows you to pray in a focused and powerful manner. Many people struggle with distraction in their prayers. They have a hard time staying focused, but in praying God’s Word, I can almost guarantee you will be less distracted.

 

If you can take away anything from this post that will help your prayer life, I would be delighted. There is nothing greater than communion with God, but please understand that you can experience improvement in your prayer life. In teaching them the Lord’s Prayer, Jesus helped the disciples to grow in their prayer life (along with millions of others down through the ages), and I think Luther’s advice continues to be relevant to us today. Using this method of praying God’s Word is an effective way to stay sharp in our prayer lives. Why not give it a try?

He Knows Before We Ask

A couple weeks ago we were playing in our back yard when I noticed our son John headed towards the red wagon. We store our little red wagon underneath the deck and I watched John grab ahold of the wagon and try to pull it out from under the deck. John is not quite two years old so I knew he was going to have a hard time moving the wagon and it did not take me long to figure out what would happen next. Past experiences told me that John likes to be pulled around in the wagon and so I said to myself, it is only a matter of time before he would soon be trotting over, asking me to pull the wagon out, put him in, and start dragging him all over the place. Sure enough, that’s exactly what transpired. It was fascinating for this happy parent to witness these events and I enjoyed every minute of my time with my son.

This experience made me think of the words of Jesus. “And when you pray, do not heap up empty phrases as the Gentiles do, for they think that they will be heard for their many words. Do not be like them, for your Father knows what you need before you ask him” (Matthew 6:7-8). What follows is the passage on the Lord’s prayer. But isn’t it amazing that God knows what we need before we ask Him? Isn’t it remarkable that when we pray, we are not bringing new information to God? Of course, we all know that God is omniscient – He’s all knowing – and He knows us better than we know ourselves, but how much does that knowledge affect our prayer? If God already knows our needs before we ask them, then it follows that prayer is more about admitting our need and then going to the One who is all-sufficent to meet that need. You see, one of God’s great purposes in prayer is to build our faith and trust in Him. As we go to God again and again in prayer and see how He answers our prayers in the most amazing ways, our faith grows. Like a son that is inclined to go to his father when he has a need, we too as followers of Jesus begin to naturally look to him for our needs. My hope for you and me is that this humble, child-like dependance upon our Heavenly Father would only grow and multiply in the coming weeks and months.

“If you then, who are evil, know how to give good gifts to your children, how much more will your Father who is in heaven give good things to those who ask Him!” (Matthew 7:11)

A Prayer For Our Son

This Sunday (July 14th) our son John will be dedicated to the Lord. Although my wife and I did this long before he was born, Sunday will be more of a public proclamation in front of our church family. Steph and I have the God-given responsibility of raising this child, but there is also an element of resignation on our part where we give John back to the Lord. In essence we are saying, “He is yours God – use him for the glory of your name.” This is our prayer – the prayer we have been praying for the past year and will continue to pray as John continues to grow and develop.

Precious Jesus,

Thank you for blessing us with our little man, John. When he was born, I was so overwhelmed with emotion that I cried. What a wonderful blessing John has been to our family! As we prepare for his formal dedication service on Sunday, we want to commit him to you. He is yours. Use him as you see fit. Bring him to a saving knowledge of the Jesus, even at a young age. May he come to understand and glory in the gospel of Jesus Christ and may you raise him up to be a great man of God.

May John love you with all his heart, soul, mind and strength. Give him a good mind that is exercised in the things of God. Give him a heart that longs hard after you. Give him a mouth that proclaims your grace and goodness wherever you send him. Give him the courage to stand for truth – Your Truth – in a world that is constantly shifting and embracing evil at an alarming rate. Give John the strength to persevere and remain steadfast for Christ. Give him a love for Thy Word and give him wisdom beyond his years. Bless him with a wonderful wife who shares the same love for Christ. And give them children of their own to dedicate back to you.

What a gift you have given us in our son John! May you now give us the grace we need to “bring him up in the discipline and instruction of the Lord” (Ephesians 6:4). Stephane and I can’t do this apart from your grace and wisdom. And when he is all grown up, help us to let go of him. Following Jesus is risky and dangerous and you may send him somewhere we don’t think is “safe.” But we give him to you – he is dedicated to your service, wherever and whatever you may call him to. Fill John with your Spirit. Guide him all his days. Empower him with your grace.

In Jesus name, Amen.

Finding that “open door for the word.”

“Pray also for us, that God may open to us a door for the word, to declare the mystery of Christ, on account of which I am in prison.” (Colossians 4:3)

Every Christian is surrounded by non-Christians.  Whether it is next-door neighbors, co-workers, relatives, or friends, there are people in your life who are not following Jesus.  Unfortunately, there are many professing Christians who are unconcerned about this reality.  They are not burdened that people around them live without hope and have not embraced the gospel of Jesus Christ.  We would do well to look at the evangelistic example of Paul and his heart for the lost.

As you will note from the verse quoted above, evangelism starts with prayer.  The apostle, as much as anyone, knew the power of prayer in converting the lost.  As skilled as he was in apologetics (check out Acts 17), Paul’s evangelism strategy was not limited to persuasion and strength of argument.  Above all, he relied on the power of prayer.  We too must pray for the lost souls around us.  If you don’t see results immediately, please don’t give up.  I have been praying for a friend of mine for over a decade and I believe that one day God will save him.  But we MUST persist in prayer.

When we are consistently praying for the lost souls around us, it goes without saying that we will also be looking for opportunities to “share” the gospel.  Part of our prayer will be that God would give us the opportunity to share the gospel.  That is exactly what Paul requested from the Colossian believers – an open door to declare Christ.  Friend, don’t be afraid to pray that prayer, just make sure you’re ready when God brings the opportunity your way (1 Peter 3:15).

I do understand that evangelism is not easy.  If it was easy, Paul would not have ended up in prison.  But we must realize that temporary suffering is well worth the price.  Remember that we not only have the greatest, most glorious news in the world (the gospel of Jesus Christ), but also the most powerful vehicle on earth (the Holy Spirit of God) to spread that news.  I want to encourage you to keep praying for your lost friends and then watch how God works and uses you in the process.

If my people….will pray

The most important thing the people of God can do this election season is to pray. We must pray, “Your will be done” (Matthew 6:10) O God, in this presidential election. We must pray that God would bring glory to His great Name over the next month and in the coming four years. And we must pray that as the people of God, we would look inward at our own hearts and lives. As 2 Chronicles 7:14 reminds us, “if my people who are called by my name humble themselves and seek my face and turn from their wicked ways, then I will hear from heaven and will forgive their sin and heal their land.” This verse is both a challenge and a promise. In essence, if we humble ourselves before God, he will heal our land.

The consistent testimony of the Bible is that “the Most High rules the kingdoms of men and gives it to whom he will” (Daniel 4:17). God establishes kingdoms and empires and determines who will rule those kingdoms and empires. And while the thought of another four years of Obama in the White House does not thrill me in the least, we have to be open to the possibility that it may be the will of God. We must remember that as Christians our citizenship is ultimately in heaven (Philippians 3:20) and that whatever citizenship we currently enjoy, it is only temporary.

As we acknowledge God’s sovereignty this election season, let’s not forget that we can (and should) pray. The most important thing we can do as Christians is to call upon our God and King. He will “hear from heaven” the cries of His people. Let’s not miss this opportunity. God may just use this time to bring revival and spiritual awakening to our land.

Learning to Pray

I have been learning some things lately. I am learning that if I stretch consistently (once per day), my back feels better. I am learning that if I eat a big healthy breakfast, I have more energy throughout the day. And I am learning that if I don’t eat a massive meal for supper, I sleep better at night.

The truth is, I already knew these things before. I am sure that you did too. The problem for me was that I never had the discipline to implement these basic health practices into my life. Now that I am being more intentional about following them, I feel better and healthier.

But there is something much more important that I have been learning about – the power of prayer. Once again, it’s not that I didn’t know prayer was important. Every Christian knows that. It was more a matter of implementation. In the busyness of life, prayer is often the first thing that suffers even though we know that shouldn’t be the case. As a pastor, a husband, a father, and a neighbor, I simply can’t function (at least effectively) without God’s power and strength in my life. So rather than letting prayer get pushed aside, I have made prayer a much higher priority in my life. Whether it’s during my morning devotional time, throughout the day in whatever I am doing (1 Thessalonians 5:17), or with my family, I am learning to pray.

I love the story of how Jesus taught his disciples to pray. In Luke 11:1-4 we read, “Now Jesus was praying in a certain place, and when he finished, one of his disciples said to him, Lord, teach us to pray, as John taught his disciples. And he said to them, When you pray, say: Father, hallowed be your name. Your Kingdom come. Give us each day our daily bread, and forgive us our sins, for we ourselves forgive everyone who is indebted to us. And lead us not into temptation.”

Obviously, the disciples recognized that Jesus had a remarkable relationship with His Father. They knew they had a lot to learn about prayer, which I think is what motivated this question. So Jesus taught them a simple, but powerful little prayer. It’s not that as soon as they learned it, they had mastered prayer. Rather, Jesus gave His followers a model to follow, so that they might grow in humble dependence upon their Father in Heaven.

If you are “in Christ” then you have the great privilege of learning to pray for the rest of your earthly life. When you reach glory, there will be no need for prayer as you will be in the presence of Almighty God. How delightful and joyous that will be! “Behold, the dwelling place of God is with man. He will dwell with them, and they will be his people, and God himself will be with them as their God.” (Revelation 21:3)